Celebrate Concord’s 386th Birthday and all-new Concord Museum Celebration

WE’RE MAKING HISTORY (Literally)!

CONCORD’S BIRTHDAY AND THE ALL-NEW CONCORD MUSEUM!

In celebration of Concord’s 386th Birthday and the opening of the Concord Museum’s 16 new permanent galleries, the public is invited to a week of activities including Forums, Gallery Talks, Encampments, and Family events starting Labor Day, September 6 through Sunday, September 12, 2021.

The week-long celebration includes free Museum admission for all Concord residents and the opportunity to see the newly renovated Museum first-hand on Saturday, September 11 and Sunday, September 12, 2021.

 

On Tuesday, September 7, 2021 the public is invited to a panel discussion “Concord Farms: Resilience, Revolutionaries, and Renegades” on the history of agriculture in Concord that is both informative and celebratory as we help spread the word about the resilience of the Concord farmer. On Wednesday, September 8 join Jacqueline Jones, the president of the American Historical Association and Concord resident, in a conversation about her prize-winning books including: Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow: Black Women, Work and the Family from Slavery to the Present.

 

Drop by the Museum to experience the history of Concord’s incorporation as a town! Families can participate in activities that explore life and craft in the era of the 1600’s Concord from Friday, September 10 through Sunday, September 12.

Free outdoor community activities are scheduled on the weekend! Meet baby lambs and a fluffy angora rabbit outside the Museum. Watch as their wool and fur are carded and spun into fine yarn with a master weaver at work at a loom. On Sunday, visit an encampment with the Acton Minutemen for cooking, music, crafts, and musket drills as the men and women prepare for battle.

 

The final phase of Concord Museum’s decade-long $16 million renovation project is culminating with the opening of renovated and interactive galleries and celebration starting on Labor Day, September 6, 2021. The ten newest galleries include a renewed focus on Concord’s famous Transcendentalists Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, the women who led the effort to abolish slavery, and African Americans who lived in Concord before and after the Civil War.

Friday, 9/10:

11am: Henry David Thoreau Gallery Talk

2pm: Farming in Concord: History Learning Center Program

 

Saturday, 9/11:

10am Celebrate Concord Community Day

11am Mill Brook Walking Tour 

2pm Getting a Living Gallery Talk

 

Sunday, 9/12:

10am Celebrate Concord Community Day

11am Incorporating Concord Gallery Talk

2pm History Learning Center Program

For a full program listing of Family Activities visit www.concordmuseum.org

Sponsors: WBUR, Gourmet Catering and Middlesex Savings Bank.

 

 

CELEBRATE CONCORD’S 386th BIRTHDAY AND THE ALL-NEW CONCORD MUSEUM

In celebration of Concord’s 386th Birthday and the opening of the Concord Museum’s 16 new permanent galleries, the public is invited to a week of activities including Forums, Gallery Talks, Encampments, and Family events starting Labor Day, September 6 through Sunday, September 12, 2021.

The week-long celebration includes free Museum admission for all Concord residents and the opportunity to see the newly renovated Museum first-hand on Saturday, September 11 and Sunday, September 12, 2021.

 

On Tuesday, September 7, 2021 the public is invited to a panel discussion “Concord Farms: Resilience, Revolutionaries, and Renegades” on the history of agriculture in Concord that is both informative and celebratory as we help spread the word about the resilience of the Concord farmer. On Wednesday, September 8 join Jacqueline Jones, the president of the American Historical Association and Concord resident, in a conversation about her prize-winning books including: Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow: Black Women, Work and the Family from Slavery to the Present.

 

Drop by the Museum to experience the history of Concord’s incorporation as a town! Families can participate in activities that explore life and craft in the era of the 1600’s Concord from Friday, September 10 through Sunday, September 12.

 

Free outdoor community activities are scheduled on the weekend! Meet baby lambs and a fluffy angora rabbit outside the Museum. Watch as their wool and fur are carded and spun into fine yarn with a master weaver at work at a loom. On Sunday, visit an encampment with the Acton Minutemen for cooking, music, crafts, and musket drills as the men and women prepare for battle.

 

The final phase of Concord Museum’s decade-long $16 million renovation project is culminating with the opening of renovated and interactive galleries and celebration starting on Labor Day, September 6, 2021. The ten newest galleries include a renewed focus on Concord’s famous Transcendentalists Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, the women who led the effort to abolish slavery, and African Americans who lived in Concord before and after the Civil War.

For a full program listing of Family Activities visit www.concordmuseum.org

 

Sponsors: WBUR, Gourmet Catering and Middlesex Savings Bank.

 

 

 

 

July 23: This Day in History

The Concord Museum offers so many lessons about our history.

Did you know significance of July 23?

On July 23, 1846, Henry David Thoreau spent a night in the Concord Jail. Learn more about the story behind Thoreau’s arrest and how it sparked his essay “Civil Disobedience” in this week’s edition of History at Home presented by the Concord Museum!

ENVISIONING THOREAU’S ARREST

Upon leaving Walden Pond to run an errand, Henry David Thoreau was unexpectedly arrested by the local constable. In this two minute video, join Curator David Wood as he narrates the story of Thoreau’s arrest for non-payment of the poll tax in July of 1846.

LOCKED IN WITH THOREAU

Thoreau’s night in the Concord jail sparked his writing of “Civil Disobedience” which left an indelible mark on history through its influence on movements for nonviolent change.  Curatorial Associate Erica Lome gives us a closer look at the lock and key used to hold Thoreau in his cell that night in a two-minute video, sign up to watch it.

FAMILY ACTIVITY

History at Home: Learn about Thoreau’s night in the Concord Jail in 1846 and how it sparked his subsequent essay, “Civil Disobedience.”

This week’s Family Activity is “Use Your Voice” which encourages kids to stand up for a cause they believe in!

Sign up for this lesson and more through the History at Home, offered by The Concord Museum